Reflections from Christmas at Ivy Creek

Christmas at Ivy Creek is always a highlight of the musical year here at our church. This year we had over 1200 guests in three presentations, 73 singers, 28 in the orchestra, 30 in our older children’s choir, 22 in the youth choir, 5 working in audio/visual, one narrator, and a partridge in a pear tree. Approximately 160 of our Ivy Creek people of all ages served in worship ministry this weekend. It is truly a joy to serve with these people.

Each year, my goal is to provide a worship experience that allows our intergenerational worship ministry the opportunity to share their musical talents. Not only do I intend to use groups of all ages, but I try very hard to select music that is varied in style. We sang congregationally as well, but here is a list of the songs and arrangers we used this Christmas in the link below. I always like knowing what types of things my colleagues are using each Christmas so I can get ideas for future years.  This year I pulled several things that have been around for awhile and mixed them with some new things. Don’t underestimate a song that is 10-15 years old and reuse it when it works. If it’s still available, it’s probably because it’s a good tune and worth repeating. I ALWAYS use things I’ve used before if it’s appropriate and it fits. 100 percent of the time, these tunes are some of our choir’s favorites. This year is no exception. This year, we used several tunes I used in the early 2000s and our choir LOVED them.

CIC 17 order

Finding things that I know will work musically/textually for my groups is essential. Here are the criteria I use when selecting music for Christmas at Ivy Creek each year in NO particular order:

  1. The music must be varied stylistically. There must be a balance between new and old (familiar). There must be SOMETHING from the major music types. I try to find something that hits black and southern gospel, a carol arrangement or two, something more “choral” or traditional, contemporary Christmas music, something “fun” (perhaps even secular).
  2. The music must be “catchy.” Call it cliche, but I believe if you want people to enjoy singing and playing in your music ministry, they have to love the music. Otherwise, the congregation will not enjoy listening if the choir and orchestra is not engaged.  I have a theory that selecting music is 70 percent of what makes a good event. I don’t think there is an exact science to it, because every church is different, but I do believe we should examine what characteristics are common in popular music and apply some of that to our selection of choral music. Personally, I’m listening for the “hook” in the song. Does the song grab my attention by the first chorus?
  3. The text and music should complement each other. Musicians study word painting in music as part of their training. We should never stop this! In fact I try to capitalize on it. When rhythmic figures and musical phrasing lend themselves to accentuating the text, we do that to bring out the message of the song.
  4. Some of the music must challenge my singers and players. Every year there is a piece or two that everyone knows will require some more time. I like that, because it gives us a goal to stretch our abilities. It’s definitely more satisfying in the end!
  5. The texts (each song and collectively) must tell the gospel story. I always, always make sure we never forget to mention the cross, the resurrection, and the second coming. We have JOY of the Christmas story and HOPE because of what happens AFTER he was sent.

I’m praying for many of my friends who have musical presentations in the coming weeks. May the gospel truth be shared boldly and the Holy Spirit prick the hearts of those listening to respond in faith!

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