NEW Every Morning!

The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. Lamentations 3:22-23 (ESV)

I’m an avid runner. I usually log between 35-40 miles a week. Running is a mentally and physically therapeutic way for me to think through issues I’m dealing with and commune with God. I need this time most days; I crave it.

One morning, a couple of weeks ago while stretching before a run, I was overwhelmed by the way the light was peering through the pine trees as the sun was rising and the dew was still heavy on the grass. I thought, “God, thank you for your mercy that is new every morning.” At that moment, I couldn’t get “The Steadfast Love” the Maranatha chorus by Edith McNeill from the mid-seventies, out of my head as I ran that morning. During every mile, the truth of this scripture song washed over me and renewed my mind and spirit.

You see, the preceding weeks have been quite challenging. I’ve been emotionally and physically worn out and pulled from many angles. Most of the things I was dealing with were ministry related and worthy of my attention, but I certainly lacked refreshment. I had been worrying how, in my own strength, I was going to accomplish all that God had called me to do. In the busy-ness of life, I was being disobedient by not trusting in God’s faithfulness to give me the peace I’ve needed. Oh, but the Holy Spirit knew I needed some encouragement that morning as He used the beauty of His creation to recall the scripture I needed to regain peace.

In the book of Lamentations, the prophet Jeremiah uses the Hebrew word, חסדים, translated as mercies. This term is used 250 times in the Old Testament and is an all-inclusive term for God’s love, goodness, forgiveness, compassion, and faithfulness. We all need to be reminded that there is hope when we are in despair; God is faithful and merciful to us when we lose perspective and need renewing.

I encourage you to take some time, maybe even tomorrow morning, to watch the sun rise and consider how great God’s faithfulness and mercies are toward us. When you go through trials, tough times, or just need some refreshment, be reminded that God is molding and shaping you into His image. No matter where you’ve fallen short, God’s mercy is new every morning.

Great is Thy faithfulness! Great is Thy faithfulness!
Morning by morning new mercies I see;
All I have needed Thy hand hath provided—
Great is Thy faithfulness, Lord, unto me!

Sky

Worship Without Response Isn’t Worship

Search me, O God and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting! Psalm 139: 23-24.

When I surrendered my life to Christ at age eleven, I had a deep desire to become more like Christ. As time went on, I faced challenges that would distract my focus from Christ, but I could always count on worship to realign my heart and mind. Very simply defined, worship is our response to who God has been and will continue to be. It’s in this response where we consider the attributes of God we realize how deeply unworthy we are to be children of God. We must submit ourselves to Christ, allowing the Holy Spirit to do a deep work in us—changing and transforming us into the image of God.

Does your church have a time of response in corporate worship? Believe it or not, some churches don’t have a time to respond at any point in their service. A lack of response is simply not worship. There is no worship without response. The prophet Isaiah deals with this clearly in Isaiah chapter 6 when he responds to the Lord saying, “Here Am I Lord, send me!” As we behold God’s glory, we are “being transformed into the same image.” (Colossians 3:10).

When I was thirteen, I was thankful for a time of response. During a youth week at my church, I was confronted with the realization that God was calling me to surrender my life to vocational ministry. It was there, after struggling with whether or not I was being called, that God revealed to the verse Jeremiah 1:7, “Do not say I am only a youth, for you will go to everyone I send you to and speak whatever I tell you.” In that moment I was confronted with the call—the call that asked me to be obedient and surrender my life to whatever (and wherever) the Lord had for me.

I cannot fathom not being confronted regularly with the realization that I need to constantly renew my mind (Romans 12:1-2) so I match up with our Creator. If your church does not have a time of reflection/response/invitation, it’s time to make that a priority. Yes, it means we must confront our sin but the cost of discipleship demands that we align ourselves with the truth and walk in it. We cannot worship without response, because unless we humble ourselves before a Holy God we will never be able to worship Him in SPIRIT and truth.

 

Ways to Demonstrate Value to the Builder Generation

In my last post, Finding Value and Purpose for the “Builder” Generation in Your Music Ministry, I discussed the impact being in an intergenerational choir had on a choir member from the Builder generation. Because the post was getting a little long due to the narrative from the daughter of this choir member, I decided to wait to write about some practical ways leaders can demonstrate value to Builders in our choirs.  Here are a few ideas, although there are doubtless many more:

  1. Encourage them to be a part of the choir. While this may seem axiomatic, you’d be surprised how many Builders simply don’t feel wanted in the church choir. I’m not sure who has made them feel inferior, but several Builders I’ve been in contact with recount a similar story—they simply felt no longer valued. Just making them feel welcome, inviting them to participate, etc. will go a long way Builders (or any generation for that matter).
  2. Find a seat that allows them to sit if they need to. Many Builders have health issues that prevent them from standing for long periods of time. Make it easier for them to participate by allowing them to sit when they need to, providing a stool if needed, or anything to make them feel less “inferior” to other members. These members don’t want to feel awkward about needing physical concessions, so be sure to not draw attention to that need with the other choir members. Side note: these concessions don’t only apply to Builders, there are others who need help or assistance with physical limitations and you should aim to make it as easy for them as well. Getting in and out of the loft (if you have one) or risers may be challenge. Figure out a way to make it easier for those needing assistance. Perhaps have them come to the platform earlier than the rest.
  3. Sit Builders next to helpful choir members. I’ve mentioned it before, but it bears repeating, where people sit in your choir is important. Yes vocal timbre and height are important, but strategically mixing generations may prove to be even more important. I almost never put Builders by other Builders. More often than not, I make sure there are helpful choir members on either side of our Builders for various reasons, which include things such as:
    *helping them find their place in the score- mobility and dexterity are certainly not what they used to be even if they’re good music readers.
    *Be their ears– hearing in a large choir may be problematic at that age; others can tell them what they missed.
    *Help them physically– getting up and down out of their seat, helping pick up dropped folders, etc.
    I depend on these helpful choir members more than they know. I want them to tell me when there are concerns with our older adults. Usually there are issues that I can resolve once I know.
  4. Consider the tessitura/range of the musical literature. Let’s be real; as we age, our voices just ain’t what they used to be! Most older adults have weakening of breath control, loss of range, and if not careful–that widening vibrato that can lead to a wobble. While the purpose of this post is not to diagnose and correct vocal faults, it is something that should be considered. An EASY way to make concessions for literature that has extreme ranges is to re-work/re-voice parts so those unable to sing the parts as written have alternatives. Be careful when mentioning the changes—don’t imply that only older adults have these issues with their range, just simply say, “these notes are alternatives for those uncomfortable with how high this part is.” This gives everyone who can’t an “out.” Do mention that all those who CAN should sing as written.
  5. Start a Senior Adult Choir. While this might seem counterintuitive to being intergenerational, I think that age-stratified groups are helpful as long as they exist in intergenerational ministry-settings. What better way to show value to your Builders than to give them a mission-minded, ministry group that allows them to have some ownership of their own in worship leadership. This group doesn’t have to be just your church members, it can be open to the community, which really create in-roads into being a light in your community. This group usually has more free time (when not headed to doctor’s appointments) so get them out and singing in the community- sharing the gospel and building the Kingdom.

Builders who can still WANT to be involved in the life and ministry of your church. Make it as easy as possible for them to participate…just as you would anyone else.